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Documentary "Fed Up"

Touted as "The film the food industry doesn't want you to see," "Fed Up" will release to select cities on May 9, May 16 and May 23. This documentary explores why, despite media attention and government policies to combat childhood obesity, generations of kids are expected to live shorter lives than their parents. The film links the obesity epidemic to added sugar in food processing, food marketing and profit-driven motives. Click here to watch the trailer.

“Fed Up” focuses on the obesity epidemic in the United States, following a group of children for more than two years and documenting their uphill battles to follow the conventional wisdom of 'diet and exercise' to live healthier, fuller lives. The film also showcases interviews with food system thought leaders such as Dr. David Kessler, former FDA Commissioner; Gary Taubes, author of “Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It; Michael Pollan, author of “Omnivore's Dilemma;” and Mark Bittman, columnist for The New York Times.

CFI encourages producers, leaders in the food system and others to proactively engage in values-based discussions about today’s food system. Unfortunately, there are no easy answers to the daunting challenge of obesity. Rather than blaming today’s food industry, CFI advocates for providing consumers with the information they need to make informed choices that improve public health and recognize that meaningful solutions will require thoughtful leadership from policy makers, health educators, food companies, farmers and more. Lasting solutions will require the participation of all food system stakeholders.

 

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One of CFI’s goals is to facilitate an informed conversation on food topics. When discussing the documentary, we encourage you to use the following values-based statements to build consumer trust in your production practices or operation. CFI can help you tailor this information, if interested.

  • I understand the concerns of many in regards to increasing obesity in this country. There are no easy answers to the daunting challenge of obesity.
  • Consumers deserve the information they need to make informed choices that improve public health.
  • Meaningful solutions will require thoughtful leadership from policy makers, health educators, food companies, farmers and more. Lasting solutions will require participation from all food system stakeholders.
  • Consumer choice should be celebrated and protected. The best food choices for one family may not be right for another. We should support the right we each have to choose the food that fits our lifestyle and our family budget.
  • Understanding our choices and how they affect our food supply is vital to preserving our personal right to choose the best food for our family’s dinner table.
  • We should each be free to buy the food that works best for us. Access to healthy and affordable food is necessary to ensure that millions of American families do not go to bed hungry.
  • Whether we choose food that is organic or vegan, prepackaged or fresh, locally grown or conventionally raised, from the supermarket or from the farmers market, we all want food raised in a responsible way, and that is safe, wholesome and meets our family’s needs.
  • I am dedicated to processing/packaging/distributing food that is safe, nutritious and affordable. I take great pride in knowing that consumers can go to their local grocery store or restaurant and purchase food that is safe and nutritious for their family.
  • Everyone has the right to expect food to be grown and delivered safely and responsibly and deserve accountability when it is not.
  • We all want well-grown foods that are safe and wholesome and make us feel good about eating them. And we want to have access to the choices we count on at the prices that work for us.
  • We can’t overstate the importance of getting the right calories to the right place at the proper time because whether in the U.S. or around the world, nutrition is the foundation for achievement. Food insecurity in the U.S. is at modern day record levels and it is growing globally. The World Health Organization says malnutrition during childhood usually results in decreased health and lower educational achievements during adulthood.
  • Obesity, the flip side of the food insecurity coin, is a serious health concern for children and adolescents. The American Heart Association estimates that one in three children and adolescents in the U.S. are overweight or obese and are at risk for health problems such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes during their youth and as adults.
  • Food insecurity, malnutrition and obesity trap children in an intergenerational cycle of ill health and poverty. Reducing the ability to produce the food we need will limit food availability and increase the cost of food which will negatively impact both nutrition and obesity by limiting the availability of healthy, affordable food choices.
  • Obesity is a critical public health issue, but simplistic policy initiatives that suggest easy solutions are a disservice to the very people who are looking for information and the support to create healthy lifestyles.

For more information from the experts, please check out these resources from Best Food Facts:

Engage People